Call us at  808.937.5806
Established 2004
Menu
Slide

February 13, 2020

Written by:

Highlights from Hawaii Doc Talks

By: Dr. Britta Zimmer

I recently had the opportunity to attend the annual Hawaii Doc Talks conference to immerse myself in the most up to date research and science in primary care integrative health. This Hawaii Doc Talks conference was conceived of in 2014 to address the need for continuing education requirements to be met by physicians in Hawai’i.  In an attempt to disrupt the prevailing PowerPoint paradigm, the conference is modeled after TED Talks – 25-minute presentations meant to engage and inspire, beyond simply educating. One of the big perks and draws of this conference, held annually in January, is that this conference attracts some of the best doctors from around the country who want to present and/ or get their continuing education credits in beautiful, warm Hawaii during the winter.

This conference feels like a multi-sensory playground for me, there is a tremendous amount to learn and do with experts in my field. Last year, I was selected to present twice at this conference therefore this year felt more relaxing as I was there solely to learn and reunite with colleagues. Some topics included a discussion on how mental health is imperative to physical health and how they are married and inspiring to one another. This presentation boosted the understanding of current evidence-based care to explore the future of mental health diagnostics and treatment.  

Chronic neurological conditions were also the main topic of this conference with extensive presentations on the latest in research pertaining to dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis, and general cognitive decline.  The protocols and research for these neurological conditions coincide with what we know pertaining to attention deficit disorder. How brain inflammation and particular practices set up a cascade of events to increase the risk for these neurologic diseases as well as impede positive treatment outcomes.

One of the many take-home points which I would like to share with you is dementia (and ADHD) risks of oral diphenhydramine (Benadryl) use. Chronic use of this class of medications and other anticholinergic sleep aids leads to increased progression and risk of diseases associated with cognitive decline. Diphenhydramine is critical in allergy medicine but if this medication is prescribed chronically for anxiety and/or sleep this research needs to be heeded. 

Coupland CAC, Moore M, Hippisley-Cox J. Association of Anticholinergic Drug Exposure With Increased Occurrence of Dementia—Reply. JAMA Intern Med. 2019;179(12):1730–1731. DOI:10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4908

Stella  F, Radanovic  M, Balthazar ML, Canineu  PR, de Souza LC, Forlenza OV.  Neuropsychiatric symptoms in the prodromal stages of dementia.  Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2014;27(3):230-235.

October 22, 2019

Written by:

Staff Training at the Farm!

Last week Pacific Quest staff members participated in a company-wide training focused on Horticultural Therapy and Rites of Passage.  It was a great opportunity for the team to come together on our new farm property and have time to connect while learning new skills and strategies to work with our students.

Horticultural Therapy Director Travis Slagle teaching a workshop on “Rites of Passage in the Garden” highlighting the Polynesian voyage and canoe plants.

The training began with an introduction to the Four Shields and the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics that’s utilized at Pacific Quest and an integral part of our program.  After the intro, the team divided up and spent the morning at various “stations” that focused on different learning objectives.  Staff members had the option of picking which workshop they wanted to participate in. Some of the options included: Meditation & Mandala workshop, Cordage and Ti lei making, medicine walk and planting skills, soil & compost, and hard project skills & “imagineering”. 

Field Manager Anthony Florig leads a workshop on “Tools for Relating with Tools”

One of the main goals was to emphasize the importance of how to incorporate these various lessons and projects into the daily routine with students. PQ Field Therapist Sarah Blechman, who helped organize and facilitate the training comments, “The whole day was so engaging! It was abundantly clear the facilitators were authentically passionate about the rich union and incredible effects of the interplay between horticulture, rites of passage and how to facilitate the two using the neurosequential model. My favorite part was when our program guides, managers and therapists all worked together to create our first garden bed in our ethnobotanical garden. Working on such a large project together felt like the whole community was working on a gift for our new farm.”

July 27, 2018

Written by:

Ultramarathon Fundraiser: Helping Hawaii

Mark Agosto and Mike Sullivan

Many of you continue to reach out and share your concern about the people of Hawaii being affected by the Kilauea volcano eruption.  While Pacific Quest is far from danger and unaffected by the volcano, our wonderful community in the Puna District have lost their homes and been displaced (the total number of homes consumed by lava exceeds 600!).  Relief efforts are in full effect, and we want to help!

Alumni and Family Services Director Mike Sullivan, and Co-Executive Director Mark Agosto are racing a 120 mile ultramarathon in August, and have dedicated their training efforts and racing prowess to help the people of Hawaii.  They have created the fundraiser: Helping Hawaii, and can be accessed by clicking the following link: Ultramarathon Fundraiser: Helping Hawaii.

“Racing for a cause” gives meaning to training and racing, and as Mike and Mark have witnessed the devastation happening in Puna, they became passionate about creating a fundraising goal.  Please consider visiting their fundraiser page to read more about their ultramarathon endeavor or to donate.  And be sure to follow us on Facebook and Instagram from August 14-19, as they will be posting photos and stories from the six day race course (yes, that is six days of running through the Colorado mountains)!

July 25, 2018

Written by:

PQ’s Clinical Model Published by CTA Press

Dr. Lorraine Freedle, Clinical Director and Travis Slagle, Horticultural Therapy Director received notice that their article on Pacific Quest’s clinical model has been published through the ChildTrauma Academy Press. The article, titled, Application of the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics (NMT) in an Integrative Outdoor Behavioral Healthcare Program for Adolescents and Young Adults provides a research-based overview of PQ’s clinical model with an emphasis on the neurodevelopmental applications of horticultural therapy.

First, the article reviews the research behind PQ’s clinical model including its foundations in neuroscience, outdoor behavioral health, horticultural therapy and integrative health care.  Next, the article provides an overview of the five components of the Clinical Model. The camp system and horticultural therapy activities are then discussed in the context of neurodevelopment and the four functional domains of NMT: Sensory Integration, Self-Regulation, Relational Functioning, and Cognitive Problem Solving. Finally, research on PQ’s model is presented.

This article is an excellent, accessible resource for parents and professionals interested in learning about Pacific Quest’s clinical model and how it works. The article is published in Proceedings of the Second Annual Neurosequential Model Symposium available on Amazon.

Read the article here!

May 15, 2018

Written by:

Oprah puts Dr. Bruce Perry and NMT in the Spotlight

By:  Kristen McFee, MA, LPCC

Kristen McFee, MA, LPCC

As Dr. Bruce Perry sat down to an interview with Oprah on 60 Minutes, we watched in anticipation as April marked two years of Pacific Quest being Site Certified in the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics© (NMT).  As Founder and Senior Fellow of the Child Trauma Academy (CTA). Bruce Perry, MD, PhD has expertise in child and adolescent psychiatry, neurodevelopment and traumatology.  Dr. Perry is highly respected internationally and has done extensive neurobiological research on the effects of trauma in young people.  He has led the Pacific Quest team into certification and maintenance of the NMT.

The Neurosequential Model© integrates neurodevelopment, developmental psychology, traumatology, sociology and other disciplines to understand individuals and the family.  Pacific Quest uses this model to inform program design and individualize interventions. Initially, the focus of treatment is developing regulatory capacities to support neurodevelopment and to optimize learning.  Next, students strengthen relational health and problem solving abilities.

Our trained clinicians use the NMT assessment process to collect developmental history, assess current functioning and inform clinical decision making.  This approach guides treatment through a selection of interventions and program design.

To support brain development Pacific Quest utilizes a “bottom up” approach following Dr. Perry’s sequence of engagement:  “Regulate, Relate and Reason.” This is the process of moving from the bottom of our brain (brainstem) up to the top (cortex).  The sequence is very important. When a person is regulated or feeling emotionally and physically settled, they are more able to relate or feel connected.  When a person is connected, they are more able to reason and engage in higher level executive functioning, which is critical for problem solving, prediction, perspective taking, etc.

At Pacific Quest, the garden lends itself to many opportunities to regulate. Regulation involves patterned, rhythmic, repetitive activity.  This includes digging, weeding, breaking apart lava rock to make room for new gardens, building rock walls and clearing land. Regulation also includes daily exercise, expressive therapies such as art, quiet breathing meditations or cooking, chopping and stirring in the kitchen.  Our integrative team works hard to build rapport and relationships with students so they can support and challenge them in their daily goals, living skills and group engagement. Through this regulatory and relationship support, students practice reasoning. Reasoning skills include being a camp leader and having to schedule an entire day and hold peers accountable to camp expectations. Students often create garden projects or legacy projects in which they have to plan, organize and problem solve allowing for a natural method to practice executive functioning.   Students often process and reason in their therapeutic work as they reflect, come into awareness and work to shift from their old story (negative behavior) into their new story (healthy behavior) . But first, they have to tell their story.

In a 60 Minutes Overtime report, Oprah reflects on her experience of doing this story with Dr. Perry. She described the process as “Life Changing” for her and expressed a hope that this story of trauma informed care will be revolutionary. Dr. Perry and Oprah expressed the importance of connection and having a sense of value.  Oprah emphasized the importance of sharing our story and asking the question, “What happened?” She explained, not only is this an important question for those who have experienced trauma, but it is the most important question we can ask of anyone.

To continue and share our work, Dr. Lorraine Freedle, Clinical Director and Travis Slagle, Horticultural Therapy Director will be presenting at the Neurosequential Model International Symposium in Banff, CA, June 13-15, 2018.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dF20FaQzYUI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqu54ZlhINc

February 21, 2018

Written by:

Mike McGee Receives Scholarship Award

Pacific Quest is proud to announce that Mike McGee, Family Program Manager, was awarded a National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Hawai`i scholarship!  This scholarship supports social work students in good standing who are making a difference in their communities.  The NASW Student Scholarships were first awarded in 2009 and aim to assist students in their education as they pursue careers in social work.

Mike McGee, Family Program Manager

Mike is currently pursuing his MSW at the University of Hawaii – Manoa, focusing on Mental and Behavioral Health.  The program itself has a focus on indigenous methodologies and populations, which ties in with the Rites of Passage programming that Mike spearheads at Pacific Quest.  Of the award, Mike comments, “ I am truly humbled to be chosen for this scholarship. Social work is such a unique field in its acknowledgement of the strength and capacities of all human beings. Throughout my years of experience at PQ, I see how these strength-based values are essential for the therapeutic process.” Mike will continue to apply his passion for the rich marriage of Rites of Passage and horticulture therapy in his current role of Family Program Manager.  Mike hopes to further utilize his education and experience  in pursuit of becoming a therapist at Pacific Quest.

This is Mike’s second scholarship award.  Last year he received a scholarship from the Zachary Fochtman Foundation to carry on a legacy of a young man who aspired to become a Wilderness Therapist.   The award is given annually to individuals that are currently in the wilderness therapy field.   Dr. Lorraine Freedle, Clinical Director, comments, “Mike has a solid and unique skill set, which he continues to develop.  He will carry Zachary’s legacy forward with integrity.  We are proud to have him on our team.”

Mike will receive the award on March 16th in Honolulu – Congratulations, Mike!

December 12, 2017

Written by:

Horticultural Therapy Training Day

By:  Isabel Holmes, Academic Coordinator

This month Pacific Quest will host two company wide Horticultural Therapy trainings.  Last week, over 40 staff members gathered at Reed’s Bay for the first training.  We were able to utilize the full campus and make the most of our garden experiences for staff and the land. The day included plenty of high-energy horticulture-themed games and scavenger hunts to help people across departments and programs get to know one another and get excited about the land.

Square foot gardening at Reeds Bay

Expert facilitators who have extensive experience in the field, led lessons on everything from how to care for a tree and how to treat a seed to the science of compost and a practical approach to the square-foot gardening technique. There were also quieter break-out sessions during which Travis Slagle, Horticultural Therapy Director, shared his expertise and experience with everyone and his team of clinicians worked closely with small groups on how to lead horticultural therapy activities and manage student needs.  Travis comments, “At PQ, we believe the greatest thing we can grow in a garden is a genuine curiosity about life, and a deeper awareness of ourselves and our relationship with the environment.  The beauty of this training is the opportunity for all direct care staff at PQ to come together to learn and practice experiential methods that integrate horticultural activity with the most current evidence based practices and research from the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics (NMT). By participating in this training, therapists and guides join a growing movement in nature assisted therapies that goes beyond the hiking and survival approach of traditional wilderness therapy.”

New this year were the Learning Passports, a compilation of worksheets containing thoughtful questions about each lesson so that participants could take notes, cement their new knowledge, and begin to plan ways to take that knowledge and experience forward to our students. After a delicious lunch, the group rotated through regulating activity stations, learning to make cordage, practicing their drumming skills while learning about the regulating capabilities of bilateral movement, and learning about the Hawaiian concept of “Ha” meaning breath.

The experience culminated in a speed-dating style activity where participants prepared a brief pitch to convince a hesitant student to join them and learn something new about the garden. The group rotated round-robin style through two lines, counting how many colleagues they could convince to join their lesson!

The day concluded in handing out completion certificates, which everyone greatly appreciated. There were many thank-yous and positive responses to the organization and thoughtful content of the day, as well as much gratitude for our energetic facilitators! We look forward to the second training this week!

November 21, 2017

Written by:

Makahiki Celebration at Pacific Quest

By: Crystalee Mandaguit, Logistics Director

Every year Pacific Quest hosts a special day for students and employees that focuses on the Makahiki celebration.  This is an important season in Hawaiian culture and honors the God Lono and celebrates the abundance of the aina (land). The Makahiki celebration spans approximately four lunar months – from around October or November until February or March.

​This week we will be preparing a feast of turkey, pork and a vegetarian dish called laulau, which will be​ cooked in an imu (underground oven)​.  Preparing food in an imu requires patience, as the cooking time is a slow overnight process.  The night before, meats will be salted and laulaus will be prepared.  While this preparation is underway, the imu will be stocked with wood and rocks.  Once the wood is set on fire the rocks begin heating up as the fire burns for hours.  While the fire is burning, banana trees are cut down, smashed and broken into smaller pieces and ti leaf plants will be harvested.

Preparing the imu with ti leaves

​Once the rocks are extremely hot, they’re carefully placed to make a flat surface.  The rocks are then covered with pieces of banana stump which contain water and will create lots of steam.  Ti leaves are added on top of the stumps to help contain heat and moisture in addition to acting as a fire barrier so the food does not burn. Next, the pans of meat are placed on the ti leaves and then covered with more ti leaves.  The last step includes placing wet sheets over the pit and finally covering it with a tarp.  Once the tarp is over the food the edges of the tarp will be covered with dirt to trap in heat, moisture and steam.  We leave the food in the imu overnight and come back the next day to uncover the imu and pull out the meats.  The students are excited to see the covering and uncovering of the imu during this special preparation for the celebration.

The day of the feast each camp will be preparing a special part of the menu which will consist of stuffing, mashed potatoes, cranberries, gravy and salad.  For dessert Kalo (taro) is harvested from the land​ and will be​ peeled, boiled, grated down, and mixed with honey and coconut milk.  This mixture is then wrapped in Ti leaf and cooked.  We will also prepare a special favorite – sweet potato haupia pie!

The Makahiki celebration is a special occasion where students and staff work side by side to create a meal for the entire group to enjoy.  It’s a day filled with cultural lessons, including games, crafts, storytelling and chants. It’s a time when the ohana (family) gets to connect with each other and share gratitude for the abundance of the land, family, friendship  and community.

October 10, 2017

Written by:

PQ Featured on LA Talk Radio

Wilderness Therapy Hawaiian-Style

This week Dr. John Souza, Primary Therapist and Mike Sullivan, Alumni & Family Services Director were featured on LA Talk Radio “Answers For the Family“.  During the program they shared their experiences with developing and implementing family therapy with young adults, often referred to as “emerging adults”, in an Outdoor Behavioral Healthcare setting. Additionally, Mike and John compared the common “myths” with the facts of emerging adulthood, while also providing insights into the importance of deepening family engagement with this population, as well as how nature-assisted therapy can promote both immediate and long-term improvements in family functioning.

Listen to the full radio show here:

http://www.latalkradio.com/sites/default/files/audio/Answers-100917.mp3

At Pacific Quest we fully utilize family participation in the therapeutic process.  By involving the whole family in the healing process, we strive to improve communication, increase empathy and develop usable conflict resolution skills, which help deepen each individual’s understanding and trust in the greater process.

For more information about our Family Program visit:

https://pacificquest.org/our-programs/young-adults/family-involvement/

September 27, 2017

Written by:

Hawai`i Hosts International Sandplay Therapy Congress

By:  Dr. Lorraine Freedle, Clinical Director

Sandplay therapists and researchers from 24 countries gathered in Kailua-Kona this summer to explore the latest trends in Jungian Sandplay Therapy and to participate in the 24th Congress of the International Society for Sandplay Therapy (ISST).

With support from my Pacific Quest ohana and the Hawai`i sandplay community, I served as the primary conference organizer and host.  After two years of planning and anticipation, we were excited to realize that the conference surpassed all expectations!

Kahu Kauila Clark offered lessons in Hawaiian culture and ceremony, providing grounding each morning while eight PQ therapists participating in this advanced training opportunity spread the Spirit of Aloha with our visitors.

Research was presented on the effectiveness of Sandplay Therapy in treating individuals with anxiety, trauma, parental distress, and co-occurring disorders.

Neuroimaging data revealed how people access and reprocess memories through Sandplay and also provided evidence for neural synchronization between the therapist and the client during Sandplay Therapy.

I presented original research on the neuropsychology of Sandplay Therapy and the role of Sandplay in the treatment of adolescents and young adults with co-occurring trauma and substance use disorders.

Sandplay Therapy is offered to students at Pacific Quest. This nonverbal method has roots in Jungian psychology, play therapy, and eastern contemplative practices.  Touching the sand, using symbols for self-expression, and entering a state of mindful presence activates multiple brain systems for healing.  We have found that Sandplay Therapy complements our holistic approach and helps our students to express and resolve emotional and personality issues that may be inaccessible in verbal therapies alone.

On September 29, 2017 twelve therapists on our team will begin a year-long intensive and experiential training in Sandplay Therapy.  This series not only allows me to provide STA/ISST-certified training at Pacific Quest; it also improves quality of care for our students and helps my team practice self-care and grow stronger together.

Dr. Lorraine Freedle, Pacific Quest’s Clinical Director is an international sandplay teacher (STA/ISST), serves on boards of the Sandplay Therapists of Hawai`i and the Sandplay Therapists of America and is the Research Editor for the Journal of Sandplay Therapy.

For more info, visit:

International Society for Sandplay Therapy (ISST) https://www.isst-society.com/

Sandplay Therapists of America (STA) http://www.sandplay.org/

PQ's COVID-19 PROTOCOLS

X